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AT&T Confronts Intense Legal Battles Amid Massive Data Breach Impacting 73 Million Customers

AT&T faces lawsuits after a data breach affecting 73 million customers. The telecom giant allegedly failed to protect user data, with hackers gaining access to personal information. Learn more about the implications of this cybersecurity incident and the legal action taken against AT&T.

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It’s a nightmare scenario: AT&T, one of the largest telecommunications companies in the U.S., has admitted to a massive data breach that exposed the sensitive information of 73 million current and former customers. Now, they’re facing multiple class-action lawsuits as a result.

Legal Battle Begins

Since AT&T confirmed the breach on Saturday, ten lawsuits have been filed against the company. One of them is being handled by Morgan & Morgan, a law firm known for its recent success in a privacy lawsuit against Google. They are representing plaintiff Patricia Dean and others similarly affected by the breach.

The lawsuit argues that AT&T failed to adequately protect the personal data of its customers, leading to a cyberattack and subsequent data breach that exposed sensitive information for a whopping 73 million people. This includes names, addresses, phone numbers, dates of birth, Social Security Numbers, and email addresses.

A Timeline of Denials

Back in 2021, threat actor Shiny Hunters claimed to have hacked AT&T and attempted to sell the stolen data. AT&T denied these allegations, saying the leaked data samples didn’t belong to them. Fast forward to March 17, 2024, when another threat actor named ‘MajorNelson’ leaked the entire database on a hacking forum for free, confirming it was the same data from Shiny Hunters’ attack.

Despite this, AT&T continued to deny that the leaked data originated from their systems and claimed there were no signs of a breach. However, after conducting an internal investigation, they finally admitted on March 30, 2024, that the exposed data belonged to 7.6 million current account holders and approximately 65.4 million former account holders.

Worse still, AT&T revealed that the passcodes for 7.6 million customers were exposed in the leak. These passcodes are required for customer support or sensitive account changes, so this breach could have allowed attackers to gain access to accounts more easily.

Years of Risk

AT&T believes the leaked data is from 2019 and earlier, but they still can’t determine whether it came from their systems or a partner. Their initial and subsequent denials about the origin and authenticity of the leaked data, coupled with their inability to determine the source through timely investigations, have put customers at risk of scams and phishing attacks for nearly three years – if not longer.

Dean’s complaint argues that AT&T’s inadequate security measures and failure to provide timely, adequate notice about the data breach exposed customers to substantial risks, including identity theft and various forms of fraud. The lawsuit accuses AT&T of negligence, breach of implied contract, and unjust enrichment, and seeks compensatory damages, restitution, injunctive relief, improvements to AT&T’s data security protocols, future audits, credit monitoring services funded by the company, and a trial by jury.

A Call for Accountability

In a statement, a Morgan & Morgan spokesperson said, “As the largest telecommunications company in the country, AT&T has a crucial duty to safeguard their current and former customers’ sensitive information. We allege AT&T knew about the vulnerability that allegedly led to this breach but allowed it to occur by failing to act. We’re also alleging AT&T exacerbated the problem by failing to acknowledge the breach had occurred until March 30 of this year, allowing customers’ personal data to linger in criminal hands without their knowledge for more than two-and-a-half years. We will fight to hold AT&T accountable for their alleged actions and inactions that allowed this to happen, and secure justice for all 73 million Americans impacted by this attack on their privacy.”

We reached out to AT&T for a statement but are still awaiting a response. In the meantime, other class-action lawsuits have been filed against AT&T, including those by plaintiffs Williamson, Escano, Collier, and Cumo. These lawsuits will likely be consolidated in the future.

As consumers, it’s crucial that we stay informed about the security measures taken by the companies we trust with our sensitive information. Keep coming back to us for the latest news on cybersecurity and learn how to protect yourself from potential threats.

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Malware

Massive Roblox Vendor Data Breach: Dev Conference Attendee Info Shockingly Exposed

A Roblox vendor data breach has exposed personal information of Roblox Developers Conference attendees. The breach, discovered on November 8, exposed names, billing addresses, and order details of customers, but no financial data. Roblox has since terminated the vendor’s contract and is taking steps to prevent future breaches.

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Imagine you’re a dedicated developer, excited to attend a prestigious conference to connect with peers and learn about innovative tools in your field. You register, book your flight, and eagerly await the event. Now imagine the disappointment and concern you’d feel if you discovered your personal information had been exposed due to a data breach. Unfortunately, this scenario recently became reality for attendees of the Roblox Developer Conference.

Roblox, a wildly popular online gaming and game creation platform, boasts over 200 million active users, many of whom are young developers eager to design, create, and share games with their community. Each year, the company holds a Roblox Developer Conference (RDC) to provide networking opportunities and learning experiences for these talented individuals.

However, a notice published recently revealed that FNTech, the vendor responsible for handling registration for the conference, suffered a data breach. Unauthorized access to its systems led to the exposure of personal information belonging to attendees of the 2022, 2023, and 2024 RDC events.

What was exposed, and who is affected?

The data breach resulted in the theft of attendees’ full names, email addresses, and IP addresses. According to the data breach notification service Have I Been Pwned (HIBP), 10,386 unique email addresses were exposed. Of these, 63% (6,500) had not been exposed in previous breaches.

Worryingly, this isn’t the first time Roblox developers have been targeted. In July 2023, HIBP added information about nearly 4,000 Roblox developer accounts to its database. These individuals, also RDC attendees, had their data leaked on a hacker forum following a 2021 breach that impacted attendees from 2017 to 2020.

Understanding the risks and taking action

While the recent breach doesn’t directly put Roblox developers in immediate danger, it does increase the likelihood of targeted phishing attacks. Armed with their personal information, cybercriminals could easily craft convincing messages designed to trick developers into revealing even more sensitive data.

In response to the breach, Roblox has taken steps to prevent similar incidents in the future. However, this isn’t the first time the platform and its users have faced security threats. In November 2022, over 200,000 users installed a malicious Chrome extension called SearchBlox, which contained code designed to steal Roblox account credentials.

Don’t let this happen to you!

As an IT Services company specializing in cybersecurity, we understand how devastating data breaches can be, not only to businesses but also to individuals like the RDC attendees. Don’t leave your security to chance—reach out to us for expert advice and support to keep your data safe and secure.

Together, we can help prevent cyberattacks and protect your personal information from falling into the wrong hands. And remember, always stay vigilant and be cautious of any suspicious emails or messages, no matter how convincing they may seem.

Contact us today to learn more about our cybersecurity services, and keep coming back for the latest news and insights in the world of online safety.

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Malware

Shopify Debunks Hacking Claims, Exposes Stolen Data Connection to Third-Party App

Shopify has denied being hacked after suspicious emails were sent to customers, blaming a third-party app for the data breach. The firm’s investigation revealed that the app had accessed and stolen data from Shopify’s API, but the incident was not a security breach of the platform itself.

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Shopify, the popular e-commerce platform, has recently denied experiencing a data breach after a threat actor started selling customer data that they claimed to have stolen from Shopify’s network. But, don’t worry, it’s not as bad as it seems.

What Shopify had to say

According to Shopify, the company’s systems have not suffered a security incident. They told us, “The data loss reported was caused by a third-party app. The app developer intends to notify affected customers.

This statement comes after a threat actor, known as ‘888’, began selling data they claimed was stolen from Shopify back in 2024.

Selling alleged Shopify data on a hacking forum
Selling alleged Shopify data on a hacking forum
Source: IT Services

What’s in the data?

The threat actor shared data samples that include a person’s Shopify ID, first name, last name, email, mobile number, order count, total spent, email subscription, email subscription date, SMS subscription, and SMS subscription date. While this information is significant, it’s important to remember that Shopify itself wasn’t directly breached.

Unfortunately, Shopify did not provide any further information about the app from which this customer’s data was stolen.

A history of data leaks

The threat actor, 888, has been linked to previous data sales or leaks allegedly involving companies like Credit Suisse, Shell, Heineken, Accenture India, and Unicef.

It’s also worth noting that in 2020, Shopify disclosed that two “rogue members” of its support team accessed customer transactional records of about 200 merchants. While this is concerning, it’s essential to recognize the proactive steps the company has taken to address security issues.


Stay informed and protect your data

While this particular incident doesn’t seem to be a direct breach of Shopify’s systems, it’s still a reminder to stay vigilant when it comes to our data. Make sure to stay informed about potential threats and take the necessary steps to protect your personal information.

If you’re interested in learning more about cybersecurity and how to keep your data safe, don’t hesitate to contact us and keep coming back for more valuable information.

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Malware

Hackers Expose Supposed Taylor Swift Tickets, Intensify Ticketmaster Blackmail with Power Word

Hackers have leaked alleged Taylor Swift concert tickets and intensified their extortion efforts against Ticketmaster. The group, known as REvil, is demanding a $10 million ransom for the stolen data and threatening to reveal more.

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Imagine being a die-hard Taylor Swift fan, eagerly awaiting her next concert, and then finding out that your ticket information has been compromised. Well, that’s precisely what happened to a large number of fans recently when hackers leaked the barcode data of 166,000 Taylor Swift Eras Tour tickets. The hackers have warned that more events will be leaked if a $2 million extortion demand isn’t met.

Back in May, a notorious threat actor named ShinyHunters started selling data on 560 million Ticketmaster customers for $500,000. Ticketmaster later confirmed the data breach, stating it was from their account on Snowflake, a cloud-based data warehousing company they use to store databases, process data, and perform analytics.

By April, threat actors had begun downloading Snowflake databases of at least 165 organizations using credentials stolen by information-stealing malware. They then blackmailed these companies, demanding payment to prevent the data from being leaked or sold to other threat actors. Companies known to have had data stolen from their Snowflake accounts include Neiman Marcus, Los Angeles Unified School District, Advance Auto Parts, Pure Storage, and Satander.

When Concert Dreams Turn into Nightmares

Today, a threat actor known as Sp1d3rHunters has leaked what they claim is the ticket data for 166,000 Taylor Swift Eras Tour barcodes used to gain entry on various concert dates.

Sp1d3rHunters, previously named Sp1d3r, is the threat actor behind the sale of data stolen from Snowflake accounts, publicly extorting the various companies for payments. The extortion demand, shared by threat intel service HackManac, reads, “Pay us $2million USD or we leak all 680M of your users’ information and 30 million more event barcodes, including more Taylor Swift events, P!nk, Sting, Sporting events F1 Formula Racing, MLB, NFL, and thousands more events.”

The post claims the barcode data is for upcoming Taylor Swift concerts in Miami, New Orleans, and Indianapolis. It includes a small sample of the alleged barcode data, containing the value used to create a scannable barcode, seat information, the face value of tickets, and other information. The threat actor even shared details on how to turn this data into a scannable barcode.

While the barcode data wasn’t part of the initial leak of stolen Ticketmaster data samples released by the threat actors in May, some of the newly leaked data can be found in the older leaks, including the hashed credit card and sales order information for the tickets.

The group behind these attacks is ShinyHunters, which has been responsible for many data breaches over the years. These include leaking the data for 386 million user records from 18 companies in 2020, an AT&T breach impacting 70 million customers, and most recently, the leaking of 33 million phone numbers used with the Authy multi-factor authentication app.

Update: Ticketmaster has informed us that unique barcodes are updated every few seconds, so the stolen tickets cannot be used. “Ticketmaster’s SafeTix technology protects tickets by automatically refreshing a new and unique barcode every few seconds so it cannot be stolen or copied,” Ticketmaster told us. “This is just one of many fraud protections we implement to keep tickets safe and secure.” They also confirmed that they did not engage in any ransom negotiations with the threat actors, disputing ShinyHunter’s claims that they were offered $1 million to delete the data.

Protect Yourself and Stay Informed

This incident is just one example of how vulnerable our personal data can be in the digital age. To stay informed about cybersecurity threats and how to protect yourself, make sure to keep coming back to our IT Services page. Our team of experts is dedicated to helping you stay one step ahead of cybercriminals. Don’t let hackers ruin your concert experience or compromise your personal information. Stay informed and stay safe.

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